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Antarctica has lost nearly 3 trillion tonnes of ice since 1992 – The Independent


The Independent

Antarctica has lost nearly 3 trillion tonnes of ice since 1992
The Independent
Achieving this is impossible without satellites. Antarctica is too vast, too remote – satellites are our only means of monitoring its behaviour on a continental scale. Satellites launched by the European Space Agency and Nasa allow scientists to
Ramp-up in Antarctic ice loss speeds sea level riseFlorida Weekly
New electronic skin gives prosthetics a sense of painAxios

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Antarctica is melting faster than we knew. Here’s what it will take to … – NBCNews.com


NBCNews.com

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Antarctica Is Melting Way Faster Than Anyone Expected – Popular Mechanics


Popular Mechanics

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The rate that Antarctica is melting has tripled since 2007, new … – MarketWatch


Yellowhammer News

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Ice losses from Antarctica have tripled since 2012 – EarthSky

Scientists in the U.S. and Europe reported this week (June 13, 2018) on what they said what the most robust assessment to date of ice loss in Antarctica and its contribution to global sea level rise. The assessment – funded by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) – combines 24 satellite surveys of Antarctica and involves 80 scientists from 42 international organizations. Its results are that ice losses from Antarctica are moving at a faster rate now, with the rate tripling since 2012. The result has been that global sea levels have risen by 0.12 inch (3 millimeters) in that timeframe alone. A statement from NASA said:

 

According to the study, ice losses from Antarctica are causing sea levels to rise faster today than at any time in the past 25 years.

The peer-reviewed journal Nature published the recent results of the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise (IMBIE) on June 13, 2018.

Assessment team co-lead Erik Ivins at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said:

This is the most robust study of the ice mass balance of Antarctica to date. It covers a longer period than our 2012 IMBIE study, has a larger pool of participants and incorporates refinements in our observing capability and an improved ability to assess uncertainties.

NASA said:

The team looked at the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet from 1992 to 2017 and found ice losses from Antarctica raised global sea levels by 0.3 inches (7.6 millimeters), with a sharp uptick in ice loss in recent years. They attribute the threefold increase in ice loss from the continent since 2012 to a combination of increased rates of ice melt in West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula, and reduced growth of the East Antarctic ice sheet.

Prior to 2012, ice was lost at a steady rate of about 83.8 billion tons (76 billion metric tonnes) per year, contributing about 0.008 inches (0.2 millimeters) a year to sea level rise. Since 2012, the amount of ice loss per year has tripled to 241.4 billion tons (219 billion metric tonnes) – equivalent to about 0.02 inches per year (0.6 millimeters) of sea level rise.

West Antarctica experienced the greatest recent change, with ice loss rising from 58.4 billion tons (53 billion metric tonnes) per year in the 1990s, to 175.3 billion tons (159 billion metric tonnes) a year since 2012. Most of this loss came from the huge Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers, which are retreating rapidly due to ocean-induced melting.

At the northern tip of the continent, ice-shelf collapse at the Antarctic Peninsula has driven an increase of 27.6 billion tons (25 billion metric tonnes) in ice loss per year since the early 2000s. Meanwhile, the team found the East Antarctic ice sheet has remained relatively balanced during the past 25 years, gaining an average of 5.5 billion tons (5 billion metric tonnes) of ice per year.

Antarctica’s potential contribution to global sea level rise from its land-held ice is almost 7.5 times greater than all other sources of land-held ice in the world combined. The continent stores enough frozen water to raise global sea levels by 190 feet (58 meters), if it were to melt entirely.

Knowing how much ice it’s losing is key to understanding the impacts of climate change now and its pace in the future.

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Antarctica is screwed and so are we – The Outline

Buckle up, folks, because we know a lot more about Antarctica than we did yesterday—and it is not good.

According to several Antarctica-related studies all published today, a series of natural processes protected the Antarctic ice sheet from melting completely 10,000 years ago. Now, we’re pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere way too quickly to rely on these processes to protect the icy continent from melting in the future.

For perspective, Antarctica has enough water stored in its ice to raise sea levels by 58 meters, or 216 feet, if it disappeared entirely. That would completely obliterate states like Florida and displace hundreds of millions of people in Brazil, Argentina, Guinea-Bissau, Denmark, China, Indonesia, and Australia.

Researchers from Northern Illinois University who studied Antarctica’s rebound 10,000 years ago found that, at its worst, the continent melted to a dangerous place where it was even smaller than it is today. However, they urged against undue optimism: what happened 10,000 years ago was natural. What’s happening today is human-caused, and it’s happening far more quickly.

“What happened roughly 10,000 years ago might not dictate where we’re going in our carbon dioxide-enhanced world, where the oceans are rapidly warming in the polar regions,” lead researcher Reed Scherer said in a press release. “If the ice sheet were to dramatically retreat now, triggered by anthropogenic warming, the uplift process won’t help regrow the ice sheet until long after coastal cities have felt the effects of the sea level rise.” Read more

Antarctica Has Lost More Than 3 Trillion Tons Of Ice In 25 Years – NPR


NPR

Antarctica Has Lost More Than 3 Trillion Tons Of Ice In 25 Years
NPR
Scientists have completed the most exhaustive assessment of changes in Antarctica's ice sheet to date. And they found that it's melting faster than they thought. Ice losses totaling 3 trillion tonnes (or more than 3.3 trillion tons) since 1992 have
Antarctica is losing ice twice as fast as anyone thoughtPBS NewsHour
After Decades of Losing Ice, Antarctica Is Now Hemorrhaging ItThe Atlantic
Antarctica Is Losing An Insane Amount of Ice. Nothing About This Is Good.Live Science
CNN –Los Angeles Times –TIME
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Paravel’s Indré Rockefeller on Cruising Antarctica – Condé Nast Traveler


Condé Nast Traveler

Paravel's Indré Rockefeller on Cruising Antarctica
Condé Nast Traveler
I was so impressed by its ability to navigate the Drake Passage from Argentina to Antarctica. As we were battling 25-foot waves, my husband and I made our way up to the top deck, overlooking the bow, and clung to the rail as the boat flew into the air

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Antarctica needs humans to protect it. It also needs humans to stay away. What’s a potential visitor to do? – PRI


PRI

Antarctica needs humans to protect it. It also needs humans to stay away. What's a potential visitor to do?
PRI
But Antarctica was different. It's “the closest you can get to leaving this planet," Ott says. “This was the first place ever that I had been where clearly people were not in charge.” No one even knew Antarctica existed until the late 1700s. It's

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Antarctica Celebrates Its First Pride Thanks to Team of Researchers – Travel+Leisure


Travel+Leisure

Antarctica Celebrates Its First Pride Thanks to Team of Researchers
Travel+Leisure
People are showing their pride all over the world, even in one of the most remote places on the planet. June is national LGBT Pride Month, and a group of LGBT-identifying people stationed at the McMurdo Station in Antarctica are celebrating by bringing
Employees at Antarctica's McMurdo Station Are Throwing a Party for Pride MonthMental Floss
How These Remote Locations Celebrate LGBTQ PrideNational Geographic

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