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Here’s How Hundreds of Baby Penguins Became Mummified in Antarctica – Smithsonian


Smithsonian

Here's How Hundreds of Baby Penguins Became Mummified in Antarctica
Smithsonian
In 2016, scientists made a gruesome discovery on East Antarctica's Long Peninsula. Hundreds of mummified Adélie penguin bodies—most of them chicks—lying at the sites of abandoned colonies. As Laura Geggel reports for Live Science, recent analysis of …
This mass grave of hundreds of penguins in Antarctica could be an ominous warningBusiness Insider
Chill with penguins at SeaWorld tourOrlando Sentinel

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Humpback Whale Baby Boom Near Antarctica [New York Times] – College of the Atlantic


College of the Atlantic

Humpback Whale Baby Boom Near Antarctica [New York Times]
College of the Atlantic
Whale researchers are concerned that this moment of health and easy access to food will be short-lived. Krill stock around Antarctica is being fished by some countries, and threatened by climate change. Additionally, reduction in sea ice endangers

antarctica – Read More…

Antarctica’s Waters May Soon Harbor a Boom of Baby Humpback … – Smithsonian


Smithsonian

Antarctica's Waters May Soon Harbor a Boom of Baby Humpback …
Smithsonian
During the late 19th to the early 20th centuries, the whaling industry reduced the population of humpback whales across the globe to near extinction. But now, the large mammals known for their haunting songs may be bouncing back in some places
TODAYonline | Humpback whale baby boom near AntarcticaTODAYonline
Humpback whale populations are on the rise in Antarctica | Big ThinkBig Think (blog)
Stunning close encounter with humpback whales [Video]Yahoo News UK

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antarctica – Read More…

Humpback Whale Baby Boom Near Antarctica – New York Times


New York Times

Humpback Whale Baby Boom Near Antarctica
New York Times
In a rare piece of good news for whales, humpbacks who live and breed in the southern oceans near Antarctica appear to be making a comeback, with females in recent years having a high pregnancy rate and giving birth to more calves. Humpback whales were

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Water births: Less pain for mum and less stress for baby

This means that, provided the baby remains fully submerged in warm water, they continue receiving oxygen through the umbilical cord until they surface meaning they do not drown. While there is no clear statistical evidence that babies born in water receive …

ocean oxygen – Read More…

Fracking chemicals alter hormones of baby mice

These UOGs combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to release natural gas from … found in groundwater at some locations with past oil and gas wastewater spills.” Researchers mixed 23 oil and gas chemicals in four …
fracking wastewater – BingNews

Baby penguin takes a shine to tourist Joel Oleson in Antarctica and clambers … – Daily Mail


Daily Mail

Baby penguin takes a shine to tourist Joel Oleson in Antarctica and clambers
Daily Mail
Penguins are usual wary creatures but when Joel Oleson visited a beach in Antarctica he made a surprising new furry friend. Oleson, 41 from California was on a private chartered tour to Antarctica when he caught on camera the intimate meeting between …

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Warming oceans are killing baby puffins

Atlantic puffin
Shutterstock

Atlantic puffins — sometimes called the clowns of the sea because of their squat bodies and odd waddles — are finding themselves in a particularly unfunny predicament.

Scientists think warming ocean temperatures are driving the puffins’ normal meals of herring away from the coastlines; they’re being replaced with other fish that are too large for puffin fledglings to swallow.

We told you in May that record-breaking Atlantic coastal water temperatures were driving some fish away. And on Friday we quoted Oceana scientist Matthew Huelsenbeck warning that the warming of the oceans is “causing significant changes to marine ecosystems.”

Well, what could be a more dramatic poster child for these impacts than the vision of adorable pufflings starving to death? From the Associated Press:

Steve Kress, director of the National Audubon Society’s seabird restoration program, has worked to restore and maintain the puffin population off the Maine coast for the past 40 years. Puffins spend most of their lives at sea, coming ashore only to breed each spring before returning to the ocean in August. The chicks swim to sea about 40 days after hatching and typically return to the islands after two years.

More than 2,000 of the birds are now in Maine, the vast majority on three islands. But the chick survival rates on the two largest colonies took a dive last summer, possibly because of a lack of herring, their primary food source, Kress said.

On Seal Island, a national wildlife refuge 20 miles offshore that’s home to about 1,000 puffins, only 31 per cent of the laid eggs produced fledglings, down from the five-year average of 77 per cent. Similar numbers were experienced at Matinicus Rock, a nearby island with more than 800 birds.

Instead of feeding their young primarily herring, puffin parents were giving them large numbers of butterfish, a more southerly fish that’s becoming more abundant in the Gulf [of Maine] or perhaps more accessible to seabirds because they’ve moved higher up in the water column. But the chicks ended up starving to death because the butterfish were too big and round for them to swallow, Kress said. Piles of uneaten butterfish were found next to some of the dead birds.

Perhaps the puffins could raid area homes and steal fish knives.

Filed under: Article, Climate & Energy
Grist

Royal baby inspires environmental campaigning

THE PROSPECT of becoming a grandfather for the first time has inspired the Prince of Wales to step up his environmental campaigning.
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Baby elephant rescue video: It doesn’t get any more heartwarming – Christian Science Monitor

Baby elephant rescue video: It doesn't get any more heartwarming
Christian Science Monitor
Elephants across Africa are fighting for survival as expanding human settlements increase the number of human-animal conflicts. Worse, elephants are being slaughtered by the thousands for their ivory tusks, which are shipped to Asia, particularly China

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