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NY Helps Farms Reduce Emissions, Prepare for Extreme Weather – U.S. News & World Report

NY Helps Farms Reduce Emissions, Prepare for Extreme Weather
U.S. News & World Report
NY Helps Farms Reduce Emissions, Prepare for Extreme Weather. ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state is giving a hand to farmers looking to reduce harmful emissions or prepare for extreme weather events. The state announced several grants for farms in …

extreme weather – read more

For Standing Rock Sioux, new water system may reduce oil leak risk

For months, North Dakota’s Standing Rock Sioux tribe has been protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline’s planned crossing under the Missouri River, adjacent to their lands, in part due to worries about contamination of their primary water source. As of early …
oil leak – BingNews

HP Commits To Reduce Emissions Intensity Of Its Products By 40% By 2020

IT giant HP has set a target to reduce the emissions intensity of its entire product portfolio by 40% by 2020 from 2010 levels

HP Commits To Reduce Emissions Intensity Of Its Products By 40% By 2020 was originally published on CleanTechnica.

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CleanTechnica

China To Triple Solar Capacity To 70,000 MW By 2017, To Help Reduce Air Pollution



China has thrilled the solar industry in the past few years with bigger and bigger solar installation targets. Of course, this also came on the back of solar capacity oversupply and a solar manufacturer shakeout that put many non-Chinese solar companies out of business, but it has also helped to pull manufacturers out of a financial crisis and further drive down the cost of solar for customers and the developers and installers who benefit from growing demand. China’s latest announcement is a pretty impressive solar target of 70,000 megawatts by 2017.

However, anyone who has followed the China solar story over the past few years knows that we may well see that target raised higher before too long. Furthermore, if the driving factor is air pollution, and China is going to be building even more coal power plants in the coming years, the push for clean energy is only going to get stronger. Anyhow, for more information on the new China solar target, see this Solar Love repost:

China’s 2017 Solar Target Raised To 70,000 Megawatts (via Solar Love)

China just seems to be getting ever more ambitious with its renewable energy targets, as recent announcements have shown. Or is “ever more desperate” the more accurate way to put it? In a recent announcement, the Chinese government revealed that…

China To Triple Solar Capacity To 70,000 MW By 2017, To Help Reduce Air Pollution was originally published on CleanTechnica. To read more from CleanTechnica, join over 50,000 other subscribers: Google+ | Email | Facebook | RSS | Twitter.


CleanTechnica

Siemens Plans To Reduce Cost Of Wind Power Production



Siemens Energy are planning to reduce the costs of offshore wind power in the coming years by increasing output, reducing weight, and improving the production and installation processes of wind power installation.

Windkraft auf dem Weg zur Kostensenkung / Wind power on its way to cost reduction

Siemens Wind Power is presenting at Stand 31C40 in Building 3.1 at the Frankfurt trade fair.
Image Credit: Siemens

The direction comes hand-in-hand with their attendance at the EWEA Offshore Trade fair in Frankfurt, Germany, where they are introducing their new range of 4 MW and 6 MW wind turbines, where they will also outline their strategies towards improving their production and installation processes.

“We want to reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for offshore wind power by up to 40 percent before the end of the decade”, declares Siemens Wind Power CTO Henrik Stiesdal. “This means that starting as early as 2020, we will offer our customers technologies that allows offshore wind power to be produced for less than 10 euro cents per kilowatt hour.”

We won’t have to wait until 2020 to see any changes to Siemens’ production methods, however. The nacelle and rotor of the new SWT-6.0-154 6 MW wind turbine they are promoting at the EWEA fair are already one third lighter than that of comparative systems, thanks in part to the introduction of direct-drive technology, which does away with the need for a gearbox.

The 4 MW offshore models are similarly displaying improvements, including upgraded generators and “aeroelastic” rotot blades, which are designed to be flexible under high wind situations and are produced with up to 20% reduced mass compared to traditional blades.

“Environmental benefits, energy supply stability and positive impacts on domestic job markets are frequently underestimated in the discussion on renewable energy sources”, added Stiesdal, pointing to further aspects of Siemens’ efforts moving forward. “These aspects, which influence the true ‘society’s cost of energy’, should also be incorporated into the ongoing cost debate.”

 

Siemens Plans To Reduce Cost Of Wind Power Production was originally published on: CleanTechnica. To read more from CleanTechnica, join over 30,000 other subscribers: RSS | Facebook | Twitter.


CleanTechnica

Bio-based Nylon Could Reduce Climate Change Emissions 85% Compared To Petroleum-based


California-based Rennovia develops chemicals and chemical processes that are bio-renewable to replace petrochemical production. In a press release, they announced that they have produced a 100% bio-based nylon polymer. Compared with petroleum-based adipic acid, which is used in making nylon polymer 6,6, using their bio-based version could reduce climate change emissions by 85%.

Image Credit: Silverxxx

“The production of 100% bio-based nylon-6,6 further validates Rennovia’s unique ability to create technological breakthroughs in the production of bio-based chemicals and materials, with projected significant cost advantages and environmental benefits vs. products produced from petroleum-based feedstocks. Practicing our AA and HMD processes at demonstration scale is the next  important milestone for the company, explained the Rennovia CEO. (Source: Green Car Congress)

About six billion pounds of Nylon 6,6 is made every year. It is used in products like carpets, tire cord, ropes, apparel, hoses, blankets, zip ties and even guitars. Rennovia’s nylon 6,6 production process could decrease typical costs 20-25%. It also uses renewable sources.

Their press release raises many questions, such as, how toxic is Nylon 6,6 for long-term exposure to humans? What about to other species? Six billion pounds a year of a material containing chemicals derived from petroleum sounds like a great deal of plastic resin that doesn’t appear to be very environmentally or human friendly.

Another question: does the bio-based polymer generate less toxic gases when it burns? Nylon 6,6 is used in automobiles, so would it reduce toxic gases from fires to use a bio-based version?

Some sources say nylon could be harmful, such as the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia, which lists it as a harmful ingredient for babies on their website. Others might say it doesn’t seem to have caused much harm so far, and it is nearly everywhere so it probably isn’t toxic.

Still, if it can be replaced with a cheaper version and made from renewable sources, it sounds like the kind of change that would be sensible. Though it may not be very harmful at all, one less source of petroleum-based chemicals in our environment couldn’t hurt.

 

 

Image Credit: Silverxxx

Bio-based Nylon Could Reduce Climate Change Emissions 85% Compared To Petroleum-based was originally published on: CleanTechnica. To read more from CleanTechnica, join over 30,000 other subscribers: RSS | Facebook | Twitter.


CleanTechnica

Thinktank: Biofuels are too expensive – and they don’t always reduce emissions – Carbon Brief (blog)

Thinktank: Biofuels are too expensive – and they don't always reduce emissions
Carbon Brief (blog)
oils is not a cost-effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Biofuel targets have been controversial ever since scientific studies began indicating that these fuels may have a far higher impact on greenhouse gas emissions than previously

and more »

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The Damage Done Down the Road — Can Green Energy Reduce Environmental Damage in Transportation?

For the last few months, I've written a series of articles about the "Damage Done" environmentally by the production and consumption of energy. The first 10 articles in the series focused on electricity generation and examined the environmental effects of electrical generation sources, both conventional (coal, gas, nuclear) and renewable (hydro, wind, solar, etc.). For the next few weeks, I plan …
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Family planning a cost-effective strategy to reduce poverty, conflict and environmental damage

In his New York Times column, Nicholas Kristof writes that family planning is “a solution to many of the global problems that confront us, from climate change to poverty to civil wars,” but that it “has been a victim of America’s religious wars” and is “starved of resources.”
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How to Double Global Food Production by 2050 and Reduce Environmental Damage

To feed the world’s growing and more affluent population, global agriculture will have to double its food production by 2050. More farming, however, usually means more environmental harm as a result of clearing land, burning fossil fuels, consuming water for irrigation and spreading fertilizer. Agriculture already imposes a greater burden on Earth than almost any other human activity, so simply …
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